Senate

Hawley raises $3M after leading efforts to block Electoral College results: report

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) has raised more than $3 million during the first three months of 2021 after leading efforts to block President Biden’s win, according to a new report. 

Hawley, who was the first Senate Republican to announce he would oppose the congressional certification of Biden’s Electoral College victory, hauled in more than 57,000 donations during the first quarter, including $600,000 during the 2 1/2 weeks following the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, Politico reported

In announcing he would oppose the certification of Biden’s Electoral College victory, Hawley referenced claims of voter fraud in Pennsylvania, assertions that were eventually thrown out in court. 

“Let me say again, as I have said before: the lawless violence at the Capitol last week was criminal. There can be no quibbling about that. Those who engaged in it should be prosecuted and punished,” Hawley wrote in an op-ed after the attack on the Capitol. “Lawless violence undermines the democratic process by which we settle our disputes and threatens our democratic life. That applies to mobs of any and all political persuasions. Mob violence is always wrong.”

Hawley added that “democratic debate is not mob violence … It is in fact how we avoid that violence.”

Critics said Hawley and other Republicans who backed former President Trump’s unproven claims of voter fraud were responsible for the Jan. 6 insurrection, a claim the Republican senator has dismissed. He has since said his goal was not to overturn the election. 

“I never said that the goal was to overturn the election,” he said. “That was never the point and it was never possible. What we need to have are elections that are fair, free and open, and I think Congress needs to do its job and look into election irregularities.”

Republicans in several states such as Georgia have used claims of voter fraud in the 2020 election to justify sweeping reform bills that opponents say intentionally make voting more difficult, especially for people of color.

Hawley has received praise from the Republican base following his objection to the certification of Biden’s win, as a majority of likely GOP voters have indicated in recent polling they still back Trump over the Republican establishment in Washington.  

“I just want to say to those people who say to us, ‘Oh, you’re the past, your moment has passed, it’s over, it’s Joe Biden’s America now,’ we’re not the past, we’re the future, we represent the future of this country,” Hawley said after receiving a warm, boisterous reception at the Conservative Political Action Conference earlier this year. “We’re not going to back down to the woke mob, we’re not going to back down to the cancel culture, we’re not going to be told what we can say or do.”

Tags Donald Trump Joe Biden Joe Biden Josh Hawley Josh Hawley Storming of the United States Capitol trumpism

Copyright 2023 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Regular the hill posts

People – Image widget – Person – Main Area Top

File - A Chevrolet Bolt is displayed at the Philadelphia Auto Show, Jan. 27, 2023, in Philadelphia. Electric vehicles are far less reliable than gasoline-powered cars, trucks and SUVs, mainly because most automakers are still learning how to build a completely new power system, according to this year's auto reliability survey by Consumer Reports.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
File - A Chevrolet Bolt is displayed at the Philadelphia Auto Show, Jan. 27, 2023, in Philadelphia. Electric vehicles are far less reliable than gasoline-powered cars, trucks and SUVs, mainly because most automakers are still learning how to build a completely new power system, according to this year's auto reliability survey by Consumer Reports.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

QAT WC-2613

People – Image – Person

In this photo released by the Governor of Sevastopol, Mikhail Razvozhayev telegram channel, a rescuer gestures as he helps people during an evacuation after storm and flooding in Sevastopol, Crimea, Monday, Nov. 27, 2023. A storm in the Black Sea took down power grids and left almost half a million people without power after it flooded roads, ripped up trees and damaged buildings in Crimea, Russian state news agency Tass said. (Governor of Sevastopol Mikhail Razvozhayev's telegram channel via AP)
In this photo released by the Governor of Sevastopol, Mikhail Razvozhayev telegram channel, a rescuer gestures as he helps people during an evacuation after storm and flooding in Sevastopol, Crimea, Monday, Nov. 27, 2023. A storm in the Black Sea took down power grids and left almost half a million people without power after it flooded roads, ripped up trees and damaged buildings in Crimea, Russian state news agency Tass said. (Governor of Sevastopol Mikhail Razvozhayev's telegram channel via AP)

People - Video Bin - Person

The White House is pushing 'Bidenomics,' but what does it mean?

The White House is pushing 'Bidenomics,' but what ...
DC Bureau: AI Legal Immunity (raquel)
KXAN: special session
DC Bureau: Biden economic display (basil)
KTXL: ca budget folo
WHTM: good gov bills
More Videos

Main area middle

See all Hill.TV See all Video

main area bottom custom html

MAIN Area bottom

People – Custom HTML – Person

MAIN AREA BOTTOM

People - Article Bin - 7 Headline List with Featured Image - Person

Main area bottom

Top Stories

See All