Court Battles

​​’Stop the Steal’ organizer served with lawsuit after 8-hour Jan. 6 commission deposition

Ali Alexander, an organizer behind the “Stop the Steal” rally, was served with a civil lawsuit on Thursday following his hours-long deposition before the Jan. 6 commission.

Alexander had met with the House select committee tasked with investigating the events around the Jan. 6 insurrection earlier on Thursday.

Alexander, who has denied that he played any role in the violence that ensued following the rally on Jan. 6, acknowledged before the deposition that he would cooperate with officials.

“We’ve provided the committee with thousands of records, hundreds of pages. And you know, unfortunately, I think that this committee has gone way too much into our personal life, way too much into my First Amendment. But I do recognize they have a legislative duty to conduct it, so we’re here to cooperate,” he organizer said.

After a more than eight-hour deposition, he was served with a lawsuit, caught on video by a Daily Beast reporter. It was not immediately clear why he had been served the lawsuit. 

An exchange between the person serving the subpoena and what appears to be one of Alexander’s attorneys was posted on Twitter and showed Alexander being served a packet of papers after he finished his deposition with the House select committee.

“I have a summons for you,” a man can be heard saying in the video. “I have a summons for you. Please know this is a valid service of process!”

“I have a summons for you. Please take it or I’m just going to have to leave it on the hood of your car,” the man continues as Alexander avoids engaging with the person. 

“What is that for? What is that for? We are his attorneys,” another man can be heard saying in the video.

After a brief back-and-forth between the two men, the man with the summons placed the packet of papers in an open car that Alexander had entered before leaving. 

Alexander is among nearly 300 witnesses who have met with the Jan. 6 select committee, which is tasked with investigating the events around the Jan. 6 riot, which sought to stop Congress from certifying President Biden’s 2020 election. 

The Hill has reached out to Alexander’s lawyer for comment.

Tags Ali Alexander Deposition Donald Trump jan. 6 riot Joe Biden Joe Biden Lawsuit

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File - A Chevrolet Bolt is displayed at the Philadelphia Auto Show, Jan. 27, 2023, in Philadelphia. Electric vehicles are far less reliable than gasoline-powered cars, trucks and SUVs, mainly because most automakers are still learning how to build a completely new power system, according to this year's auto reliability survey by Consumer Reports.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

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