The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of The Hill

Pavlich: Biden wants ‘infrastructure’ ­– Republicans should negotiate

It’s been two weeks since President Biden introduced his so-called $2.5 trillion infrastructure plan. Most of the monstrosity isn’t for traditional infrastructure, but rather a barrage of Democrat pet projects, “human infrastructure” and far left climate proposals.

Despite his promises on the campaign trail of unity and to work in a bipartisan fashion, Biden plans to get the bill passed without Republican support. Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) plans to get it done and announced Democrats have the ability to push through the bill without a single minority vote.

“The Parliamentarian has advised that a revised budget resolution may contain budget reconciliation instructions. This confirms the Leader’s interpretation of the Budget Act and allows Democrats additional tools to improve the lives of Americans if Republican obstruction continues. While no decisions have been made on a legislative path forward using Section 304 and some parameters still need to be worked out, the Parliamentarian’s opinion is an important step forward that this key pathway is available to Democrats if needed,” a spokesman for Schumer released in a statement.

However, given Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin (W.Va.), Chris Coons (Del.) and others are pushing back on the price tag of the bill and what is actually being paid for, there will have to be some compromise. This gives Republicans an opportunity to advocate for real infrastructure projects that can simply be restarted while receiving some credit for getting people their jobs back.

On his first day in office, Biden signed an executive order to halt construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. Overnight, this decision eliminated thousands of well paying union jobs and drew criticism from some of his closest allies.

“The Biden Administration’s decision to cancel the Keystone XL pipeline permit on day one of his presidency is both insulting and disappointing to the thousands of hard-working LIUNA members who will lose good-paying, middle class family-supporting jobs. By blocking this 100 percent union project, and pandering to environmental extremists, a thousand union jobs will immediately vanish and 10,000 additional jobs will be foregone,” LIUNA General President Terry O’Sullivan said at the time. “Killing good union jobs on day one with nothing to replace them, is not building back better. Hopefully, the Biden Administration will not continue to allow environmental extremists to control our country’s energy agenda at the expense of union construction workers being forced to the unemployment lines.”

“I wish he hadn’t done that on the first day because the Labors International was right. It did and will cost us jobs in the process,” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka agreed during an interview with Axios.

Biden’s current “infrastructure” plan forces unionization of a number of gig employees who don’t want to be in a union. Republicans can negotiate on this issue by asking the White House and Democrats to restore Keystone XL union jobs in return for gig workers staying independent.

Biden also halted construction on the southern border wall within hours of his inauguration. This project is not only a badly needed tool to stem the current illegal immigration crisis, but is the definition of an infrastructure project. Not to mention, many of the contracts for the material of the wall have already been paid for but the people hired to put up the wall up are out of work. Again, union workers.

“Construction crews building the steel wall along the U.S.-Mexico border were ordered to a halt Wednesday after President Biden delivered on a campaign promise and hit ‘pause’ on the Trump administration’s signature infrastructure project,” The Washington Post reported on Jan. 20.

And finally, Republicans should ask the Biden administration to resume oil and gas production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

“I saw firsthand the pain we cause when we deny our fellow Alaskans the right to pursue opportunity. Not only do these projects have the potential to responsibly develop Alaska’s abundant natural resources — of which there is a demand that would be driven to countries with lower environmental standards — these projects bring good-paying jobs, quality healthcare, and lifechanging possibilities to communities who need it most,” Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy (R) said about the move.

In the end, Democrats have the numbers to get what they want, but Republicans should fight for traditional projects that were already underway and restore union jobs Biden eliminated with the stroke of a pen.

Pavlich is the editor for Townhall.com and a Fox News contributor.

Tags ANWR drilling Chris Coons Chuck Schumer Infrastructure package Joe Biden Joe Manchin Keystone XL pipeline

Copyright 2023 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Regular the hill posts

People – Image widget – Person – Main Area Top

File - A Chevrolet Bolt is displayed at the Philadelphia Auto Show, Jan. 27, 2023, in Philadelphia. Electric vehicles are far less reliable than gasoline-powered cars, trucks and SUVs, mainly because most automakers are still learning how to build a completely new power system, according to this year's auto reliability survey by Consumer Reports.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
File - A Chevrolet Bolt is displayed at the Philadelphia Auto Show, Jan. 27, 2023, in Philadelphia. Electric vehicles are far less reliable than gasoline-powered cars, trucks and SUVs, mainly because most automakers are still learning how to build a completely new power system, according to this year's auto reliability survey by Consumer Reports.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

QAT WC-2613

People – Image – Person

In this photo released by the Governor of Sevastopol, Mikhail Razvozhayev telegram channel, a rescuer gestures as he helps people during an evacuation after storm and flooding in Sevastopol, Crimea, Monday, Nov. 27, 2023. A storm in the Black Sea took down power grids and left almost half a million people without power after it flooded roads, ripped up trees and damaged buildings in Crimea, Russian state news agency Tass said. (Governor of Sevastopol Mikhail Razvozhayev's telegram channel via AP)
In this photo released by the Governor of Sevastopol, Mikhail Razvozhayev telegram channel, a rescuer gestures as he helps people during an evacuation after storm and flooding in Sevastopol, Crimea, Monday, Nov. 27, 2023. A storm in the Black Sea took down power grids and left almost half a million people without power after it flooded roads, ripped up trees and damaged buildings in Crimea, Russian state news agency Tass said. (Governor of Sevastopol Mikhail Razvozhayev's telegram channel via AP)

People - Video Bin - Person

The White House is pushing 'Bidenomics,' but what does it mean?

The White House is pushing 'Bidenomics,' but what ...
DC Bureau: AI Legal Immunity (raquel)
KXAN: special session
DC Bureau: Biden economic display (basil)
KTXL: ca budget folo
WHTM: good gov bills
More Videos

Main area middle

See all Hill.TV See all Video

main area bottom custom html

MAIN Area bottom

People – Custom HTML – Person

MAIN AREA BOTTOM

People - Article Bin - 7 Headline List with Featured Image - Person

Main area bottom

Top Stories

See All

Most Popular

Load more