AP U.S.

White supremacist accused of threatening jury and witnesses in trial of Pittsburgh synagogue gunman

WHEELING, W.Va. (AP) — A self-proclaimed white supremacist was arrested Thursday on charges that he made online threats toward the jury and witnesses at the trial of a man who killed 11 congregants at a Pittsburgh synagogue, the U.S. Justice Department said.

Hardy Carroll Lloyd of Follansbee, West Virginia, is accused of sending threatening social media posts and emails along with comments on websites about the trial of Robert Bowers. In addition, Lloyd, 45, allegedly was responsible for stickers placed in predominantly Jewish areas of Pittsburgh directing people to a website containing his threats and antisemitic messages, the Justice Department said in a news release.

“Jury trials are a hallmark of the American justice system and attempts to intimidate witnesses or jurors will be met with a strong response,” U.S. Attorney William Ihlenfeld said. “The use of hateful threats in an effort to undermine a trial is especially troubling.”

Bowers was sentenced to death last week after a jury determined that capital punishment was appropriate for the perpetrator of the deadliest attack on Jews in U.S. history.

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The Justice Department described Lloyd as a self-proclaimed “reverend” of a white supremacy movement. He was being held without bond in the Northern Regional Jail in Moundsville. Jail records didn’t indicate whether Lloyd has an attorney who could comment on the charges.

Lloyd, who was arrested without incident, is charged with obstruction of the due administration of justice, transmitting threats in interstate and foreign commerce, and witness tampering. The charges carry a total maximum punishment of 35 years in prison upon conviction.

In May 2022, the Texas Department of Public Safety offered a cash reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to Lloyd’s arrest after he allegedly posted a series of comments online threatening to carry a firearm onto the Texas State Capitol grounds and challenge any police officer who tried to “take enforcement actions” against him. A statement from the department said Lloyd was a convicted felon.

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